Posts Tagged ‘Showbread’

Who Can Know It? by Showbread: “Expect the unexpected” is what I’ve come to, well, “expect”  from Showbread. So, unsurprisingly, their fifth endeavor sounds nothing like their previous four. The most obvious difference is the absence of screaming, so the casual Showbread fans will once again be haters. Not that Showbread cares. If you’re like me and listen to Showbread for their lyrics, you will love this record. The lyrics are typical Showbread- potent, unabashed, and thought-provoking (the only aspect of Showbread that is consistent). But the topics are heavier this time around, perhaps the reason for the more subdued, mellow music. http://www.myspace.com/showbread

 

Paper Tongues by Paper Tongues: Even though it was still quite early in the year when Paper Tongues released their mind-blowingly spectacular debut, I knew that this would be my favorite new band of 2010. Their debut is a glorious fusion of hip/hop, rock, and soul. An undeniably catchy, accessible release like this will surely propel Paper Tongues into the mainstream limelight. This is definitely the band to watch for in 2011. http://www.myspace.com/papertongues

 

 

Miracle by Robbie Seay Band: Authenticity- for me, that’s one of the most important things in an artist. Robbie Seay is one the most humble and legit dudes I’ve ever met, and Miracle is a reflection of that. The lyrical poignancy and honesty on Miracle is truly a breath of fresh air from the cookie-cutter, sugarcoated lyrics that are all too common in mainstream worship music today. Case in point, “Kingdom & A King.” http://www.myspace.com/robbieseayband

 

 

Horseshoes & Handgrenades by Disciple: I expected this. And by this I mean a change in Disciple’s sound. With only one original member remaining, it was inevitable. Say goodbye to the days of Scars Remain, and hello to mid-tempo rock songs. …I make it sound worse than it is though. There’s still some explosiveness in the new record (after all, “handgrenades” is in the title). It’s just not the same… *sigh* http://www.myspace.com/disciplerocks

 

 

15 Live by Project 86: Being one of my all-time favorite bands, I’ve been waiting for these guys to release a live album for some time now. And it almost turned out to be what I had hoped forraw, chaotic, and containing everything that’s awesome about Project 86. Two key ingredients are missing however, Randy and Steve (neither member has officially announced their departure, but they no longer tour with the band so…). Project 86 is promoting this album as a celebration of the band’s long and prosperous career, yet with the absence of two founding members all Project 86 really is anymore is Andrew Schwab. Now don’t get me wrong, Schwab is one awesome dude, but one dude doesn’t make a band (unless you’re The Rocket Summer). This leaves me wondering if P86 will make it to their 16th anniversary... http://www.myspace.com/project86

The Medicine by John Mark McMillan: Every year there’s at least one record that wows me. For 2010, The Medicine would be that album. A review of this wonderfully organic folk/rock record would not do it justice. So I’ll simply tell you to just buy it. http://www.myspace.com/johnmarkmcmillan

 

 

 

Hymns: Take The World, But Give Me Jesus by Ascend The Hill: Is it just me or are a lot of worship bands covering hymns these days? Looking at the tracklist as I downloaded this album, I was admittedly bummed to see yet another worship band covering traditional hymns. My sentiment completely changed less than thirty seconds into the album. These renditions are so modern and creative that if I wasn’t familiar with these songs, I would have never guessed them to be hymns. If you only pick up one worship album this year, make it this one (and it’s available for free at comeandlive.com, so you really have no excuse). http://myspace.com/ascendthehill

 

The Light Meets The Dark by Tenth Avenue North: I like this album. There I said it. I’ve ruined all the music snob credibility that I had in one simple sentence (if I ever had any?). It’s overproduced and cliche at times, but hey, I’m entitled to at least one guilty pleasure album a year, right? http://myspace.com/tenthavenuenorth

 

 

 

Vessels by Ivoryline: There are very few bands that I don’t get. Even if I don’t like a band, be it because it’s not my style or bad musicianship, I can usually figure out why others may enjoy it. Ivoryline is one those bands that I don’t get. At all. I didn’t see the draw of their debut record, and I don’t understand the praise for Vessels. So, I’m humbly asking for an Ivoryline fan to explain their love of this band to me in the comments section. Thanks. http://myspace.com/ivoryline

 

 

Dark is the Way, Light is the Place by Anberlin: Anberlin is back. Not in an epic way like Cities, but they have certainly made a comeback from their first major label release, New Surrender, which was slightly above a flop. Dark Is The Way is Anberlin’s maturest album yet; a happy medium between the pop sound of New Surrender and the dark rock of Cities. With this solid release, Anberlin is finally receiving the mainstream attention that they deserve. http://myspace.com/anberlin

 

 

Born Again by Newsboys: Wow, okay, here we go. Michael Tait taking over for Peter Furler totally baffled me. Actually, I should say “baffles me,” because I’m still confused even a year later after this bizarre and startling announcement. Obviously, with this huge change, the new album sounds quite different from previous ones. Less pop, plus more rock, plus… tobyMac? Yup, some tracks sound like they could have come right off of a tobyMac record, which is actually no surprise considering Toby had a hand in the album. It’s a catchy and likable album, but sadly marks the end of the quirky pop that made the Newsboys a CCM sensation. http://myspace.com/newsboys

 

Flags by Brooke Fraser: Last but not least, we arrive at my favorite album of the year. I could gush on and on about this album, or even just Fraser’s flawless vocals and impeccable tone. But I’ll try to keep it short. Sonically, Flags is a mixed bag. The upbeat songs are mostly cute and fun folk/rock, while the slower tunes are almost ethereal yet still fall into the folk genre. And then there are songs like “Jack Kerouac” that fit neither of the previous categories. Lyrically, I have yet to really dive in, but one song that has caught me thus far is “Crows + Locusts.” I honestly haven’t even dug into the song’s meaning yet; I just love the lyrical imagery. And at the risk of blubbering on for eternity, I’ll shut up now. http://myspace.com/brookefraser

Agree? Disagree? Comments on any other 2010 albums? Sound off below.

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I recently did an interview with Showbread for CMZ, check it out- http://christianmusiczine.com/2010/11/29/interview-showbread/#more-8222

Sunday at RevGen was noticeably lighter in attendance than the previous day. It picked up in the evening, but I think RevGen may want to consider going back to a Friday and Saturday for next year. Anyway, I was super excited about the line-up for Sunday, because I hadn’t seen quite a few of the bands live before, which is very unusual considering I’ve seen well over a hundred Christian bands.

After an interview with The Ember Days, I staked out a spot at The New York stage in anticipation for indie rock group Between The Trees. I honestly didn’t expect them to be as energetic as they were. They seemed to genuinely enjoy the RevGen crowd. I was surprised to learn a few days later that Between The Trees is disbanding at the end of the year 😦

 

As Showbread emerged on the Philadelphia stage, it was very apparent that they hadn’t had much sleep recently. Even though Showbread’s performance was more subdued than usual, they still performed their songs passionately (but then how can you sing “I hate music because of you” and not be passionate?) and Josh even threw in a few jokes like, “What has eight wheels and is green? Grass; I lied about the eight wheels.” After “A Man With A Hammer,” I headed over to the Come&Live! Stage.

 

A number of people earlier in the day had encouraged me to check out a worship band called Ascend The Hill. I was late to their set and only heard their last two songs, but that was all it took to make me a fan. The band recently released a new worship album, check out my review

 

I’ve been a fan of Emery since their debut album, so I was really stoked about seeing their live performance for the first time. It was one of the few performances that I stayed for the full set. Josh Head is like the Xanadu of Emery, if you’re familiar with Family Force 5. He gets the crowd going by jumping around the stage, moonwalking, and jumping off the stage to interact with the crowd. But he also contributes to the vocal duties (screaming) and he plays keys. Emery opened with one of my favorites, “Studying Politics” then they moved into an oldie but a goodie, “The Ponytail Parades,” off of their debut. Half way through their set, they announced that their upcoming album would be released in January and it would be the “heaviest album [they] ever recorded” (I hate it when bands say that. It’s rarely true.). Emery closed with the infamous “Walls” (I have to wonder if they’re getting sick of that song).

 

Mae is not really my thing, but their set was enjoyable, minus their opening song which was really mellow, and frankly, a bizarre opener. There seemed to be a number of dedicated Mae fans in the crowd, faithfully singing along with the band. I may not be into Mae, but it’s a bummer they’re breaking up because from what I saw, they’re a really talented bunch.

 

I missed The Ember Days‘ set on the Philadelphia Stage the day before, so I made it a point to get myself over to the Come&Live! stage to see their second set. They announced that they were going to start by playing through their new EP, Finger Painting (a phenomenal album btw, get it for free at comeandlive.com, along with Ascend The Hill’s new album). After the first song, I had to leave for a last minute interview with Showbread. I wish I could have seen The Ember Days’ full set, but I was not about to pass up an interview with one of my favorite bands.

 

The O.C. Supertones set was an unexpected surprise for me. I’m not a fan of ska, but the Supertones stage presence is unmatchable. I don’t think I can put it into words, it’s something you have to see for yourself. I had to move away from the dancers in the crowd a few times because I started choking from the dust rising from the ground. A slight, but steady wind blew the dust on stage and I caught the vocalist, who is known as “Mojo,” coughing a few times. RevGen was one of the few festivals that the Supertones were reuniting for, so it was a treat to see one of the most beloved Christian bands of all time.

 

Anberlin was the headliner at the Philadelphia stage on Sunday, and the only headliner that I saw at RevGen. The Florida-based alt. rock group opened like lightning with “Godspeed.” Following was “The Resistance” and “Whisper & Clamour,” during which the crowd surfing began. Anberlin continued with fan favorites like, “Paperthin Hymn” and “Unwinding Cable Car.” At this point I was exhausted, as much as I wanted to see the rest of their set, I couldn’t force my eyes open for much longer.

RevGen continues to top its line-up every year. And as far as Christian music festivals, it has one of the most diverse line-ups. I’m upset as I’m writing this though, because this year is probably the last year that I’ll be at RevGen for awhile (I’m moving to Nashville next summer). But for those of you that will be in the Frenchtown area next September, don’t miss out on one of the greatest Christian music festivals!

Showbread discusses signing to Come&Live!, their upcoming album, and tour plans for 2011 (free concerts!!!)



Showbread recently signed to Come&Live!. Can you describe how that label operates differently from other labels and why you decided to sign with them?

Josh Dies: Our friend Chad Johnson started Come&Live!. He was our A&R when we were on Tooth & Nail Records. And he left right before we did our last record on Tooth & Nail, and was like, “I’m gonna try to start a record label for ministry oriented bands, where they can give their music away for free and help facilitate that.” And we said, “That sounds awesome; when we finish our contract we might be a part of it.” So we were talking to him for a long time; we finished our last album with Tooth & Nail. It’s just a really high deal for a band like Showbread, that doesn’t care about any of the business aspect side of things or all the like stupid like, “How many records can we sell to make sure that we get on this tour,” or “to make sure that this store is gonna stock us” and all that crap. Instead, we could just say, “Let’s find a way to fund this thing, and then we can give it away.” And that’s what he wanted to do, and what we wanted to do. Right now, Come&Live! is still pretty new, but definitely here and now, on the verge of some really big breakthroughs. Essentially, all they want to do is facilitate bands like us to be able to tour full time and make music, give it away, and still be able to eat and go and play shows. So it’s definitely a groundbreaking approach to the industry.

 

Showbread had a fundraiser for its upcoming album, Who Can Know It. How did that go?

Josh: It went really well. We set out to raise $13,000 in 90 days. We raised the $13,000 in like 6 days. By the end of it we had raised $33,000, which is way more money than we would have been given on the huge record label that we were on. And we retain full rights of our music, and we can make the record we want to make, and give it away for free. And we have no traditional record label, so I’d say it went fantastically well.

 

Has the band begun production for the album yet?

Josh: No, it’s actually- in two weeks we leave to start recording. We’re recording through September and October.

 

What can fans expect with the new album?

Josh: Showbread.

Garrett Holmes: They won’t know what to expect.

Josh: It doesn’t have anything in common with any album that we’ve made before, except for the band has the same name.

Garrett: But it’s still gonna be good.

Josh: Oh yeah, and that it’s good. [To Garret] You should have been correcting me more on that!

 

Josh, I hear you’re working on a Showbread memoir? What’s the status on that?

Josh: I finished the first draft; right now the editor is working on it. It’s called The Joke We Play On The World. And it’s a pretty funny book- there’s a lot of really weird things in it that are true, but I think people will think that we’re not normal people after they read it. But maybe they’ll laugh, or maybe they’ll just be disgusted… I don’t know.

 

Showbread has it’s own video production company (In The Boat Productions). What projects have you guys been working on lately?

Josh: We just directed a video for The Ember Days, which is another band on Come&Live!, and it came out really good. We’ve been doing music videos and we make short films for fun. But it would be nice one day… we write screenplays and things like that. Who knows… knock on table.

 

For those who have never seen Showbread live, what should they expect at a Showbread concert?

Josh: It’s weird, it’s loud, and sometimes we throw things, and then that’s entertaining. You know, if nothing else is. You see a guy throw a guitar into a keyboard and everything falls down; that’s pretty cool. So, at the very least maybe something will break. There’s something in that for everyone, I think.

 

Any tour plans for the fall?

Josh: No, we’re gonna spend the rest of the year recording and then releasing the album, and then we might do some CD release shows for it. But at the beginning of 2011, we’re gonna do a long, national tour to support the record, and it’s gonna be completely free- the way the record is. So, all free shows and a free album. Can’t beat that.